Breaking of Nations

Robert Cooper in the Preface to his book The Breaking of Nations, says this:
"The
worst times in European history were in the fourteenth century, during
and after the Hundred Years War, in the seventeenth century at the time
of the Thirty Years War, and in the first half of the twentieth
century. The twenty-first century may be worse than any of these."
Daily
we read things in the news that would support Cooper’s statement that
our century, the only century that my grandson will ever know directly,
may turn out to be worst of all.
For example, I take these three
items from today’s news from the Middle East, and South Asia, and I
haven’t even delved into the African continent where perhaps the
greatest slaughter of innocents is still going on. First, Baghdad bodies.
Hardly a day goes by without our hearing about them. On September 12th
at least 60 bodies were found throughout the city. All had been shot in
the head, had clear signs of torture, were blindfolded, bound, or
gagged. This number is above last month’s average body count of 50 or
more a day, but not as high as the national average of 100 a day year
to date. The second item concerns what I will call Muslim rage,
recalling the similar Muslim anger just one year ago over the Danish
cartoons. On the same day, September 12th, Muslim leaders in Britain,
France, and Germany, in Morocco, Pakistan, and Kuwait, in Gaza, Iraq,
Syria, and Indonesia, to mention just the first ones recognized by the
ever present scandal thirsty media, registered their protest at the
Pope’s words while speaking at Regensburg University in Bavaria. On
that occasion the Pope quoted a 14th Century Byzantine emperor as
saying, "Show me just what Muhammad brought that was new, and there you
will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread
by the sword the faith he preached.” The third item concerns the
country, Pakistan, perhaps the most ungovernable land in the world
today, a country held together by not much more than the name (and
perhaps the cricket team). The Pakistan government put a women’s rights bill
on hold, thereby caving in to the Islamists. Under Islamist law all sex
outside of marriage is criminalized. Furthermore if a rape victim fails
to present four male witnesses
to the rape, she herself may face punishment. According to a
Pakistanian Human Rights Commission a woman is raped every two hours
and gang-raped every eight hours in Pakistan, and we’re told that these
figures are probably an under-estimation. Now we learn that a
government reform measure that would end these practices has been
stopped.
I don’t mean to single out the Muslims by my comments.
There is certainly ample evidence of man’s cruelty to man among other
peoples and religions. But what I find abhorrent is that while the
bodies are piling up in Iraq, a Muslim country, and while in Pakistan
also a Muslim country, men are raping women with impunity, the Muslim
leaders’ rage is directed only at the words of a Pope, words that have
hurt no one (and would probably have passed unnoticed if the “leaders”
had kept silent), words that left no bodies, no rape victims. Why is
this so? Would these “leaders” perhaps be seeking to distract the
world’s attention from the horrors that their co-religionists, in the
name of their Prophet and their religion, are raining down on their
probably countless innocent victims?

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